In this Issue of Voices of Mexico
Content

EDITORIAL
Our Voice

Diego Ignacio Bugeda Bernal


POLITICS
Trump versus Fromm:
Breaking Bad
José Luis Valdés-Ugalde

It has always been clear to the media and the discerning public that from the start of his relatively successful political period, Donald Trump has built a discourse based on lies about everything and everyone. This was a constant in his campaign: against Mexicans, Muslims, women, the disabled, war veterans, and Afro-Americans. And it continues unabated now that he is ensconced in the presidency.


ECONOMY
A Renegotiation “Made in America”
NAFTA’s Uncertain Future

Elisa Dávalos

From the beginning, the renegotiation of nafta was marked by President Trump’s statements underlining its negative effects on his country. More than an interest in “modernizing” it, his main motive seems to be either getting more favorable terms for his country or cancelling it altogether. His constant statements and those of his cabinet members have emphasized economic nationalism over the content of the agreement, despite the fact that this affects the interests of a large number of companies and the consumers in their own country.


UNITED STATES AFFAIRS
Medical Migration to the U.S.
The Case for a Brain Gain Theory

Camelia Tigau

For almost 70 years now, brain drain theory has studied the migration of highly skilled professionals, especially from underdeveloped to developed countries, from the global South to the global North. In particular, the migration of medical doctors (mds) and nurses has been seen as a most problematic and emblematic case for brain drain theory.


SOCIETY
The Edificios Condesa
And Mexico City’s Artistic Hub

Alejandro Mercado-Celis

The concentration of artists in specific districts in large cities is a generalized urban phenomenon. Spatial agglomeration of artists has mainly been studied for its role as a driving force for urban renewal and gentrification, 1 and local economic development,2 while less attention is paid to its impact on artists’ work. With this in mind, we can ask two central questions: Do artists living closely together collaborate among themselves? And, are artists living in proximity part of artistic circles?


ART AND CULTURE
MEXICO CITY. THE CITY OF PALACES,
Majestic Buildings, and Extraordinary Spaces

Living in one of the biggest cities on the planet is complicated. Moving through the daily chaos is not a major act of heroism, though; for capital residents, it’s practically a habit by now. We do have mixed feelings about our city: sometimes we love it and other times we wish we had not grown up here. But we have also acquired the ability to take the time to enjoy it, think about it, question it, long for it, project it into the future, and ask it a thousand questions, even if at bottom we know that the answers can only be found inside us, those who make it live.


THE SPLENDOR OF MEXICO
Mexico City Markets
Stores for All Five Senses
Teresa Jiménez

Listening to ingenious sales pitches; touching the fruit to see if it’s ready to eat; feasting your eyes on all manner of forms and bright colors; awakening memories with evocative aromas: all this is something that only happens in traditional markets. Launching all five senses when you go shopping is something unlikely to happen on computer screens or in labyrinthine supermarket aisles, the two places that have recently dominated commerce.


MUSEUMS
Mexico City Beyond
The Display Cases

A visual, architectural chronicle of the history of Mexico’s capital: that is what the Museum of Mexico City is. The ancient site of the Aztecs, even today of monumental proportions and a seemingly endless history, could only be housed in a venue of the same grandeur.
Mexico City’s very long history is crisscrossed by innumerable cultural and artistic productions and is continually reconstructed and re-signified. In this metamorphosis, the artistic element has had a fundamental impact on the city’s life, making it unique.


LITERATURE
Muros, Walls, Butterflies, and Poetry
An Interview with Poet and Writer Gina Valdés

Claire Joysmith

In these trumped times, when wall-building is insidiously packaged as a power-and-fear-commodity, as if it were a brand new invention, we may recall the border, that “herida abierta,” that open wound, as Chicana writer and philosopher Gloria Anzaldúa has called it, that extends across some 3 000 kilometers of land and slithers into the ocean as a high wall, lop-sided, in Tijuana, creating what is commonly known as “la esquina de América Latina,” the corner of Latin America.


SPECIAL SECTION
YOUNG INDIGENOUS MIGRANTS
INTERGENERATIONAL AND INTER-COMMUNITY DISPUTES

This section will delve into the circumstances of a social group that has not been thoroughly analyzed when studying youth and migration: the members of Mexico’s First Peoples. Susana Vargas’s article underlines the specificity of being indigenous and the colonial memories present in the narratives of young Oaxacan residents in California. Alejandra Aquino and Violeta Contreras’s contribution points out how the migratory experience of young Ayuujks (or Zapotecs) destabilizes subjectivities and practices established in their hometowns, leading to the questioning of the hegemonic identity representations of First Peoples created in the framework of the Mexican nation-state.


REVIEWS
Canadá y México durante la era Harper:
reconsiderando la confianza
Graciela Martínez-Zalce, Silvia Núñez García,
And Oliver Santín Peña, eds.
Mary Carmen Peloche Barrera

The history and current situation of Canada are dealt with only modestly in North American studies, which for several decades now have centered on the United States, its history, its domestic and foreign policy, or its relations with its neighbors, just to cite a few examples. Justin Trudeau’s taking office as prime minister in November 2015 positioned Canada as one of the central actors in international politics, above all thanks to his government’s leadership in receiving refugees, mainly Syrians. However, in Mexico a great deal is still unknown about the country of the maple leaf, whether its politics, culture, society, or economy. In addition, the importance of a broader, closer relationship between our two countries is not widely recognized.


Editorial
Our Voice
Diego Ignacio Bugeda Bernal

Politics

Trump versus Fromm: Breaking Bad
José Luis Valdés-Ugalde

Mexamerica at War with Donald Trump A Case Study in California
David R. Maciel

Rethinking Nationalisms Trump and Alt-Right “White Nationalism”
Ruth A. Dávila Figueroa

Economy

A Renegotiation “Made in America”
NAFTA’s Uncertain Future
Elisa Dávalos

Myths about the U.S. Trade Deficit
María Cristina Rosas

Scenarios and Sovereign Alternatives
On NAFTA’s Winding Road
Enrique Pino Hidalgo

United States Affairs

Medical Migration to the U.S.
The Case for a Brain Gain Theory
Camelia Tigau

Suspending DACA in the Trump Era
Paola Suárez Ávila

Society

The Edificios Condesa
And Mexico City’s Artistic Hub
Alejandro Mercado-Celis

Art and Culture

MEXICO CITY. THE CITY OF PALACES,
MAJESTIC BUILDINGS, AND ESCTRAORDINARY SPACES

Public Space in Mexico City
William Brinkman-Clark
Alejandro Hernández Gálvez

The City and Remembrance
Mariana Abreu Olvera

In Search of New Forms
The Architecture of the Mexican Revolution
Diana Paulina Pérez Palacios

The Splendor of Mexico

Mexico City Markets
Stores for All Five Senses
Teresa Jiménez

Museums

Mexico City Beyond The Display Cases

Literature

Muros, Walls, Butterflies, and Poetry
An Interview with Poet and Writer Gina Valdés
Claire Joysmith

Special Section

YOUNG INDIGENOUS MIGRANTS
INTERGENERATIONAL AND INTER-COMMUNITY DISPUTES

Colonial Remnants and
“Indigenous” Specificity
In Migration
Susana Vargas Evaristo

Community, Migration,
And Youth Cultures in the
Northern Mountains of Oaxaca
Between Mexican and U.S. State Governments
Alejandra Aquino Moreschi and Isis Violeta Contreras Pastrana

Young Mixtecs
The Vicissitudes of Life in Tijuana
Olga Lorenia Urbalejo

Dilemmas Facing
Oaxacan-Indigenous-Origin
Youth in the United States
María Eugenia Hernández Morales

Waking from the “American Dream”
Young Migrant Returnees
In Las Margaritas, Chiapas
Iván Francisco Porraz Gómez

Young Male and Female
Indigenous University Cybernauts
Between Cara a Cara and Face to Face
Jorge Alberto Meneses Cárdenas

Reviews

Canadá y México durante la era Harper:
reconsiderando la confianza
Graciela Martínez-Zalce, Silvia Núñez García,
And Oliver Santín Peña, eds.
Mary Carmen Peloche Barrera

Narcocultura de Norte a Sur.
Una mirada cultural al fenómeno del narco,
Ainhoa Vásquez Mejías, ed.
Ana Georgina Aldaba Guzmán

Directory

Director
Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez
zalce@unam.mx


Editor-in-Chief
Diego Bugeda Bernal
diebb@unam.mx

Editors
María Cristina Hernández Escobar
lilith@unam.mx
Teresa Jiménez Andreu
tejian@unam.mx


See Complete Directory

About Us

Voices of Mexico is published by the Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte, CISAN (Center for Research on North América) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico).

The magazine brings our readers information about different issues of general interest in Mexico, particularly regarding culture and the arts, the environment, and socio-economic development. It features critical articles and literature by Mexican authors in English and is distributed in Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Contact

Address: Torre II de Humanidades, piso 9, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.
Telephone: (52-55) 5623 0308
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Fax: (52-55) 5623 0308
Electronic mail: voicesmx@unam.mx