In this Issue of Voices of Mexico
Content


Our Voice

Astrid Velasco Montante


CONNECTIONS

Julieta Fierro
Unravels the Cosmic Web
Teresa Jiménez

Astrophysicist Julieta Fierro is a full-time researcher at the UNAM Institute of Astronomy; she has also been the head of outreach and a professor at the UNAM School of Sciences. She has dedicated her career to disseminating science, making big contributions, and has held posts such as the presidency of the International Astronomical Union Education Commission, of the Mexican Academy of Professors of the Natural Sciences, and of the Mexican Association of Science and Technology Museums. She is a full member of the Mexican Academy of Language.


Weaving Wonders
With No Purpose at All

Aleida Rueda
javier crúz

Ringo Starr has been almost universally liked for decades as probably the most affable member of the Beatles, the nicest guy in the universe who might have benefited from that incredible stroke of luck of being in the picture when the band decided to look beyond Pete Best. Every now and then you would read about him being one of the most underrated drummers in the history of rock, but he was rarely praised beyond his niceness and sense of humor.


Networks in Movement
Jorge Cadena-Roa

Social movements are a form of collective action. If we understand them like this, we will then ask how a certain number of people enter into contact, communicate with each other, and decide to act concertedly to achieve an end they have decided on, put forward demands to others using a range of forms of protest, and seek out allies. They resort to some form of organization, rudimentary, informal, and temporary as it may be. Even in large demonstrations, we see that people pick a starting and end point, carry banners and placards with the names of their organizations and their demands on them, express their determination to get what they want, and shout more or less shared slogans.


Reflections on the Web of Violence
And the Denial of Rights

Luis Raúl González Pérez

Except when exercised legitimately by authorities, violence implies the negation of norms and of the effective validity of rights. It undermines the bases of the fabric of society and is an attack against individuals. Different kinds of violence exist, with differing degrees, scopes, and forms of expression, the most evident of which are those linked to the insecurity our country is experiencing and those based on gender, ethnicity, se-x-ual orientations, or ideological differences, among others. Over the last several years, we Mexicans have had to learn to live with violence and understand it as a given in our reality. It is something we know will exist and that most people can do practically nothing about, except to hope not to be yet another of its victims.


Building Sisterhood
Sketch of a Living Concept

D. Tamara Martínez Ruiz
Zoe González Martínez

You’re not alone! You’re not alone! You’re not alone!
It was all of us! It was all of us! It was all of us!
Touch one and we’ll all answer!

Slogans like these, among many others, sing out in our country’s feminist marches. The masses shout these slogans especially when a single demonstrator speaks in public, writes or paints on a monument or the street, or is apprehended by the police. The rest of the women marchers show their sol-idarity, empathy, and compassion for the sisters through their songs. They enter into a wave that embraces the differences among women, that envelopes them in an identity and turns them into a single force: feminism. Throughout history, feminist women have dedicated themselves to constructing that common space, the safe space of understanding and mutual support among women that today we can call sisterhood.


The Politics of Resentment,
Protagonist in the Storyline
Of Global Populism

Estefanía Cruz Lera

How have we gotten to the point where, amidst one of most serious pandemics in human history, we are witnessing things like the denial of scientific evidence about the SARS-CoV-2 virus and a blind belief in conspiracy theories? What kind of rational thinking is behind mass protests defending “my body, my decision” in the face of mandates of obligatory mask-wearing to protect public health? What explanation can we offer in our hyper-diverse contexts for the increase in hate crimes against people with Asian features for completely baselessly being considered propagators of the virus? How is it possible for people to demand a supposed right to purchase the vaccine even if they’re not a frontline worker or a member of a vulnerable group? Are these trends new or are they only one more facet of old evils like social individualism, political mistrust, racism, or aporophobia (the rejection of the poor)? How are all these variables a breeding ground for the rise in the politics of resentment and the reinvention of global populism?


Thematic and Authorship Networks of
Publications on Mexico-U.S. Migration

Georgina Araceli Torres Vargas

The changes the Internet has produced in the circu­lation of digital information have created a need for establishing guidelines for research methods that can be used to collect and analyze data from various online environments. Netnography is one of the methods that helps researchers in various fields. It is being used more and more widely because it facilitates collecting large amounts of data and information that can be quickly organized and analyzed with a variety of computer tools.


Raíces y Tránsito

Raíces y Tránsito
Información para migrantes


Our Voice
Astrid Velasco Montante

CONNECTIONS

Julieta Fierro
Unravels the Cosmic Web
Teresa Jiménez

Weaving Wonders
With No Purpose at All
Aleida Rueda
javier crúz

Networks in Movement
Jorge Cadena-Roa

Reflections on the Web of Violence
And the Denial of Rights
Luis Raúl González Pérez

Building Sisterhood
Sketch of a Living Concept
D. Tamara Martínez Ruiz
Zoe González Martínez

The Politics of Resentment,
Protagonist in the Storyline
Of Global Populism
Estefanía Cruz Lera

Thematic and Authorship Networks of
Publications on Mexico-U.S. Migration
Georgina Araceli Torres Vargas

Virtual Mobility Pathways:
Medical Cooperation and Science
Diplomacy during Pandemics
Camelia Tigau
Alejandro Mosqueda

Entwined Voices
Paola Virginia Suárez Ávila
Susana González Aktories

Changing Networks
Fernanda Pérez Gay

The Labyrinthine Road of Life
Luis Fernando Flores

Recursion in Moral Mode
Who Can Cast the First Stone
On Social Networks?
César Rebolledo González

Two Stitches Over and One Under
Weaving Resistance with Hemp Thread
For Good Living and Well-being
Aaraón Díaz Mendiburo

Art and Culture

Piecing Together
Gina Bechelany

Mending the Public Space Through
Collective Weaving and Embroidery
Cynthia Martínez Benavides

The Textile Tradition
The Fabric of Meaning
Miguel Sosme

Hilán, Hilo: Stringer of Strings
Weaving Wisdom
For a Life Project
Hilán Cruz Cruz

Poems
by Alejandra Estrada
Illustrated by
Sebastián Álvarez (drawings)
Macarena de Arrigunaga (embroidery)

A Hybrid Time
Deep Down, It’s All Connected
Juanjosé Rivas

Engraving the Plot
Iván Gardea

Persistent Points:
Between the Possible
And the Impossible
Mariana Costa Villegas

Directory

Director
Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez
zalce@unam.mx


Coordinator of Publications
Astrid Velasco Montante
astridvm@unam.mx

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Jiménez Andreu
tejian@unam.mx

See Complete Directory

About Us

Voices of Mexico is published by the Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte, CISAN (Center for Research on North América) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico).

The magazine brings our readers information about different issues of general interest in Mexico, particularly regarding culture and the arts, the environment, and socio-economic development. It features critical articles and literature by Mexican authors in English and is distributed in Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Contact

Address: Torre II de Humanidades, piso 9, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.
Telephone: (52-55) 5623 0308
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Fax: (52-55) 5623 0308
Electronic mail: voicesmx@unam.mx