In this Issue of Voices of Mexico
Content

EDITORIAL
Our Voice

Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez


POLITICS
Politics Looks at the Earthquake
Or the Earthquake Looks at Politics?
Looking at 1985 and 2017
Margarita Favela Gavia

The September 19, 2017 earthquake inevitably reminds us of the other earthquake 32 years before; that was a turning point for part of society, among others, a group of social scientists. Therefore, we tend to look at the more recent one from the same standpoint: we want this earthquake to be a new turning point in the country’s social and political life.


BOX
Why Didn’t the Seismic Alarm
Sound before the Quake?

Bertha Serrano Torre

On September 7, 2017, at almost midnight, the seismic alarm sounded 124 seconds before an 8.2-magnitude quake was felt in Mexico City; its epicenter was in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, more than 600 kilometers away. However, on September 19, no alarm sounded before the quake. Therefore, people evacuated buildings when the ground was already shaking. The reason: this time the epicenter was “on the border between the states of Morelos and Puebla.”


SOCIETY
The Role of the Media in the
1985 and 2017 Earthquakes

Leonardo Curzio

Not every city in the world has had as many opportunities to redefine its future as our country’s capital. The last, devastating earthquake once again gave us the opportunity to rethink our circumstances in four fundamental spheres: the way this city is governed and our level of civic culture; the way we build and appropriate the public space; the Information we have about risks; and our culture vis-à-vis civil protection.


HISTORY
The Pre-instrumental Seismic
History of Morelos

Virginia García Acosta
Gerardo Suárez

The state of Morelos, located in Central-Southern Mexico, only came into being in the second half of the nineteenth century. From the colonial period, the area had been known for its good climate, the production of sugar cane and top-quality rice, and its many rivers and lagoons. It had never been known as a seismic area, despite the fact that the Trans- Mexican Volcanic Belt crosses the northern part of the state, and the Popocatépetl Volcano is one of its highest points. However, the September 19, 2017 earthquake —the same day of the year that the emblematic 1985 earthquakes took place— had its epicenter there, although with very particular characteristics that we will review here.


ECONOMY
The Earthquakes Hit
Socio-Economically Vulnerable
Populations the Hardest

Adolfo Sánchez Almanza

Mexico’s population faces different threats and vulnerabilities from man-made phenomena (chemical, sanitary, and socio-organizational disturbances, for example), as well as natural phenomena (geological and meteorological, among others). Among the latter are earthquakes, cyclones, floods, and droughts. They can all have a greater or lesser socio-economic impact, depending on society’s organizational, preventive, and response capabilities.


ART AND CULTURE
Gone with the Earthquake
Mexico’s Wounded Built Heritage
Gerardo A. Hernández Septién

The damage is immense, almost as if last September’s earthquakes had targeted the country’s cultural heritage. This time, Mexico, one of the places recognized worldwide for the wealth of its vast cultural and natural heritage, went through what it never had before: the modification of its historic face. In addition to the irreparable, painful loss of human life, these earthquakes will leave their mark on the history of our country.


TESTIMONIES
#FuerzaMéxico (#FortitudeMexico)

Astrid Velasco

Every morning the city repeats a routine to launch the day: we leave home, we walk, we drive through the traffic; we look, feel, talk; something always reminds us that we’re alive. Nobody thinks that they might die or be injured; nobody wants to see their loved ones or those close to them suffer. Terrible is the random occurrence that can suddenly hit and transform us. Those of us who lived through the earthquakes will never be the same. The 1985 quake brought us face to face with death and disaster, but also with the incredible version of Mexican society in all its solidarity and support. 2017 also filled us with sadness and, at the same time, hope.


LITERATURE
El puño en alto / Fist Held High

Juan Villoro

Eres del lugar donde recoges
la basura.
Donde dos rayos caen
en el mismo sitio.

Porque viste el primero,
esperas el segundo.
Y aquí sigues.
Donde la tierra se abre
y la gente se junta.


Editorial
Our Voice
Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez

Politics

Politics Looks at the Earthquake
Or the Earthquake Looks at Politics?
Looking at 1985 and 2017br /> Margarita Favela Gavia

Anti-Politics and Post-Truth
Earthquakes and Knowledge
With No Consequences Jorge Cadena Roa

The Earthquakes’ Social
And Political Rubble
Mistrust of Government Institutions
Laura B. Montes de Oca Barrera

Making Millennials
The Heroes of the Earthquake
Marcela Meneses Reyes

Box

Why Didn’t the Seismic Alarm Sound before the Quake?
Bertha Serrano Torre

Society

The Role of the Media in the
1985 and 2017 Earthquakes
Leonardo Curzio

In the Media, Tragedy. On the Social
Networks, Confusion and Solidarity
Raúl Trejo Delarbre

Balance Sheet of Post-Quake
Face-to-Face and Online
Social Mobilization
Juan Carlos Barrón Pastor

The Legal Community’s
Reaction to the Earthquake
Natalia Alvarado Vásquez

#Verificado19s
A Citizens’ Experience after the 2017
Mexico City Earthquake
Claudia Campero Arena
Alberto Serdán Rosales

September 19
Youth and National Unity
Natividad Gutiérrez Chong

The Military and the Earthquake
Raúl Benítez Manaut

The September 19, 2017 Quake
In Numbers
Bertha Serrano Torre

History

The Pre-instrumental Seismic
History of Morelos
Virginia García Acosta
Gerardo Suárez

Economy

The Earthquakes Hit
Socio-Economically Vulnerable
Populations the Hardest
Adolfo Sánchez Almanza

The Costs of the Disaster
The Reconstruction Funds
Roberto Herrero Buhler

Art and Culture

Gone with the Earthquake
Mexico’s Wounded Built Heritage
Gerardo A. Hernández Septién

Damage to the Cultural
Heritage and Community
Life of Hueyapan
Ricardo Claudio Pacheco Bribiesca

Recovering Monastery Murals
On the Slopes of the Popocatépetl Volcano
Elsa Arroyo Lemus

Mexico City, September 19
Fist Held High, Hand in Hand
Sergio Rodríguez Blanco

Rebuilding through Art
Isabel Morales Quezada

Emotions in Color
Armando Fonseca, Hernán Gallo, Amanda Mijangos, Gala Navarro, and John Marceline

Testimonies

#FuerzaMéxico (#FortitudeMexico)
Astrid Velasco

Two Earthquakes, One Rescue Worker
Memories from Beneath the Rubble
Enrique Chávez Poupard

Disaster Chronicle
Reflections of a Young Student,
A So-Called “Millennial”
Santiago Domínguez Zermeño

Aftershocks
Hugo José Suárez

The Other Reasons for the Disaster
Interview with A Builder
Diego Ignacio Bugeda Bernal

Literature

El puño en alto / Fist Held High
Juan Villoro

Proper Names in “The Day of the Collapse”
Alberto Vital

Directory

Director
Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez
zalce@unam.mx


Coordinator of Publications and Editor-in-Chief of this issue
Astrid Velasco Montante
astridvm@unam.mx

Editor-in-Chief
Diego Bugeda Bernal
diebb@unam.mx

See Complete Directory

About Us

Voices of Mexico is published by the Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte, CISAN (Center for Research on North América) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico).

The magazine brings our readers information about different issues of general interest in Mexico, particularly regarding culture and the arts, the environment, and socio-economic development. It features critical articles and literature by Mexican authors in English and is distributed in Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Contact

Address: Torre II de Humanidades, piso 9, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.
Telephone: (52-55) 5623 0308
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