In this Issue of Voices of Mexico
Content

EDITORIAL
Our Voice

Silvia Núñez García

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POLITICS
The Paradoxes of Donald Trump’s Victory
Paz Consuelo Márquez-Padilla

The 2016 U.S. presidential elections must be analyzed in a broader context if we want to understand the outcome. I will look at two levels of that context: the international scene and the U.S. domestic panorama. In accordance with one dominant international trend, countries are defined as exclusionary, protectionist, nationalist, populist, and anti-globalization, or, on the other hand, inclusionary, pro-migration, and pro-globalization. As examples of the former, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovenia, and Slovakia have built walls or fences. At the same time, right-wing populist political parties have risen to importance in England, where Brexit was voted in; in Italy, where Lega Nord and Forza Italia have won several local elections; in France, where Marine Le Pen is the front-running candidate; and in Poland and Turkey, dominated by authoritarian governments.

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UNITED STATES AFFAIRS
The Role of Workers and Unions in Trump’s Rise to the U.S. Presidency

Roberto Zepeda

During the 2016 U.S. presidential elections, the Industrial Heartland states, now the Rust Belt, played a significant role in Republican candidate Donald Trump’s victory. Surprisingly, he took states like Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania, which ended up being decisive for his overall win. In addition, he received more votes of unionized workers than previous Republican presidential hopefuls. Trump’s win was a surprise, as I mentioned, since all the polls predicted Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton would come out on top. This result represents a confused response by the U.S. working class to the negative effects of globalization and technological automation.

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ECONOMY
Trump, Mexico’s Auto Industry, and NAFTA

Elisa Dávalos López

President Donald Trump’s campaign statements against free trade and in favor of levying tariffs on U.S. companies that move production to other countries, particularly China and Mexico, have sparked a great deal of debate worldwide. The auto industry has particularly been in the eye of the storm because of Trump’s statements against Ford’s recent investments in Mexico.

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COLLABORATIVE DOSSIER
Views From the Borderlands. Arizona Scholars Reflect on Mexico-U.S. Connections

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ART AND CULTURE
Roots and Wings
Of Mexican Illustration

Mauricio Gómez Morín

Mexico is a visual country. Some countries are literary, like Argentina; others are discursive, like France; still others are musical, like Germany or Mali; but although Mexican culture expresses itself through different media and in many ways, it is a fact that Mexico is a predominantly visual country. Almost all Mexico’s cultural expressions have strong roots in the field of the visual. Let us just mention, for example, the aesthetics and colorfulness of our cuisine: some dishes on the Mexican table have a true artistic touch, in addition to an exquisite taste; they look “yummy.”

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THE SPLENDOR OF MEXICO
Teodoro González de León
Renovator of Mexican Architecture
Isabel Morales Quezada

Just as they say that a book only comes alive when someone takes it down off the shelf, opens it up, and starts to read, we can also say that architecture only comes alive when it is lived in, when it is walked through and enjoyed; when it becomes beloved and dear to us. For Mexican architect Teodoro González de León (1926-2016), passion and emotion were essential when designing a new project. Perhaps that is the main reason it is impossible to go through one of his works and remain indifferent.

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MUSEUMS
The Modern Art Museum

Christian Gómez

At the end of the last century, art historian Michael Ann Holly co-edited the book The Subjects of Art History. Historical Objects in Contemporary Perspectives,1 in which she put forward a provocative perspective: since our knowledge of the past is constructed without the benefit of the panoply of possibilities afforded by being present during the historical event, no final word or truth exists about it. Using a historiographic approach, she invited the reader, then, to think of the ways that the history of art has been written in different contexts, at different moments, and with different motivations.

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SPECIAL SECTION
Immigrant Farmworkers in Northeast Agriculture: Life, Labor Conditions, and Organizing for Change

Dairy farming occupies a special place in the U.S. agrarian imaginary, often associated with pastoral tranquility, family values, and laboring close to nature. However, the contemporary U.S. dairy farming sector bears little resemblance to these Jeffersonian ideals. After decades of industrial consolidation, fewer and fewer small family farms with grazing cattle dot the landscape.

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REVIEWS
Orgullo y prejuicios. Reputación e imagen de México
Karla D. González Esquinca

The recent U.S. elections have thrust the whole world into uncertainty about what will happen to that country’s bilateral relations and the international system itself. In particular, Mexico’s relationship with the United States is very important, not only because of the long border the two countries share, but also because of their strong commercial ties and the close link-up of their economies. From the time of the campaigns, many analysts realized not only how dangerous it could be for Republican candidate Donald Trump to win, but also the consequences that his speeches based on xenophobic, racist feelings were having.

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Editorial
Our Voice
Silvia Núñez García

Politics

The Paradoxes of Donald Trump’s Victory
Paz Consuelo Márquez-Padilla
The Elections Campaing and Trump in the White House Lessons and Implications
Manuel Chavez Marquez

United States Affairs

The Role of Workers and Unions in Trump’s Rise to the U.S. Presidency
Roberto Zepeda

Economy

Trump, Mexico’s Auto Industry, and NAFTA
Elisa Dávalos López

Collaborative Dossier

Views From the Borderlands. Arizona Scholars Reflect on Mexico-U.S. Connections

The Social and Economic Costs Of Trump’s Wall
Colin Deeds
Scott Whiteford

Politics, Media and The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands
Celeste González de Bustamante

The Constitution of 1917
100 Years Making Mexico’s
Revolutionary Goals into Law
William H. Beezley

Publisher without Borders
Journal of the Southwest
Jeffrey M. Banister

History through Musical Stories by Arizona’s Young Corrido Composers
Luis E. Coronado Guel

Art and Culture

Roots and Wings
Of Mexican Illustration
Mauricio Gómez Morín

A Gallery of Mexican Illustration
Fabricio Vanden Broeck

Mexican Illustration
For Children’s Publications:
The Case of El Ilustradero
Abril Castillo Cabrera

Into the Depths of Air
The Pictorial Universe
Of Virginia Chévez Pura López Colomé

Alexandra Aktories,
Venerating Water
Magali Tercero

The Permanent Ephemeral
In the Art of María Eugenia de la Garza
Gina Bechelany Fajer

The Splendor or Mexico

Teodoro González de León Renovator of Mexican Architecture
Isabel Morales Quezada

Museums

The Modern Art Museum
Christian Gómez

Special Section

IMMIGRANT FARMWORKERS IN NORTHEAST AGRICULTURE: LIFE, LABOR CONDITIONS, AND ORGANIZING FOR CHANGE

“It’s Not What You Earn, It’s What You Send” Resisting Dispossession in Southern Mexico
Aaron Lackowski

More than Money: Understanding
Farmworker Food Security
Teresa Mares

The Transnational Lives of
Migrant Youth on New York Dairies
Kathleen Sexsmith

The Mirage of the North The Story of a Former New York State Dairy Worker
Agustín Omar Rodríguez Juárez

Blind Eyes to Trafficked Labor In Western New York
Gonzalo Martínez de Vedia

Tense Spaces. Navigating Relations between Immigrant Workers and Dairy Farmers
Mary Jo Dudley

Reviews

Orgullo y prejuicios. Reputación e imagen de México
Karla D. González Esquinca

Menos constante que el viento
Héctor Iván González

Directory

Director
Silvia Nuñez
nugar@unam.mx


Editor-in-Chief
Diego Bugeda Bernal
diebb@unam.mx

Editors
María Cristina Hernández Escobar
lilith@unam.mx
Teresa Jiménez Andreu
tejian@unam.mx


See Complete Directory

About Us

Voices of Mexico is published by the Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte, CISAN (Center for Research on North América) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico).

The magazine brings our readers information about different issues of general interest in Mexico, particularly regarding culture and the arts, the environment, and socio-economic development. It features critical articles and literature by Mexican authors in English and is distributed in Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Contact

Address: Torre II de Humanidades, piso 9, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.
Telephone: (52-55) 5623 0308
                                    5623 02 81
Fax: (52-55) 5623 0308
Electronic mail: voicesmx@unam.mx