In this Issue of Voices of Mexico
Content


Our Voice

Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez


SOCIETY
Corporate Borders
Auto Industry Migrants in Mexico
Oyuki Arce Miyaki
Camelia Tigau

Globalization has changed migratory conditions for workers with professional training. This means that the classical theories on the subject are being questioned because of labor mobility within transnational corporations.
This article examines the mobility conditions of skilled workers, compared to those of similar migrants: foreign corporate migrants transferred within multinational companies, specifically coming into Mexico. These two differ because the latter are part of a labor setup that, in and of itself, generates a high degree of migration in the short and medium terms. Specifically, we are interested in knowing what relationship exists between the growth of the auto industry in Mexico and the number of immigrant workers it employs.


POLITICS
Mexamerica at War with Donald Trump
A Case Study in California
Part II

David R. Maciel

The Consolidation of Chicano Power
In the face of aggression and hostility from Donald Trump and his administration, California’s Chicano civic organizations and policymakers responded with full force and by all possible means to counter and even spin those initiatives, particularly in the political arena. Today, Chicanos are by far the dominant ethnic group at both the local and state levels and are at the forefront of the resistance. No other state in the Union even comes close to the number of Chicano elected and appointed policymakers in California.
The decades of ethnic struggles and the legacy of the Chicano movement in California are now visible and a bona fide reality. Key Chicano civic organizations, such as Hermandad Mexicana and Vamos Unidos USA, are very active in their advocacy for the civil rights of the Mexican/Latino Diaspora. Moreover, a generation of Chicano policymakers between the ages of 38 and 60 collaborate closely with these civic organizations.


HISTORY
Italian and Mexican
Migrants in the U.S.

Silvia Núñez García

In today’s complex world, differences, disagreements, and even rivalries among nations stand out. “Walls” have come into fashion for defending territories, privileges, and individuals, ratifying the position that considers setting up even more barriers to separate us and distinguish us from “the others” is a legitimate right. These circumstances surround our daily lives and are explicit in the migration that has acquired strategic importance in the international context.
For these reasons, and with the same conviction laid out by U.S. political scientist Seymour Martin Lipset when he said that nations can only understand each other in a compared perspective,2 I consider it pertinent to remember the origins of the migration of two peoples to the United States whose experience is similar. They do not recognize themselves in each other, however, in the mirror of diversity that prevails in the United States and that often divides more than it unites.


ART AND CULTURE
Freedom Has No Borders and No Human Being Is Illegal
Francisco Elías Prada

A Life Story
Everything began when I migrated to live with our ancestors, without being too aware. I was just a child, preceded by my parents’ Utopia and their lifelong quests that I later recovered and have proudly appropriated, adding my mistakes and circumstances. We traveled into the depths of these lands in Capanaparo, to the wonder of the plain, intending to contribute to stopping the violence and historic extermination of the Pume and Kuiva of Venezuela’s Apure Highlands. The attempts at getting justice continued to survive there in the memory of these peoples.


DOSSIER WATER
Toward Comprehensive Groundwater
Management in Mexico

Gonzalo Hatch Kuri

Since the twentieth century, groundwater has been a fundamental input for all economic activities. According to the United Nations, almost half of humanity uses it directly for domestic purposes (22 percent), irrigation (67 percent), and industry (11 percent). The United States and Mexico are among the world’s ten top consumers. There is, however, a significant difference between them, since U.S. consumption is 386 percent of that of Mexico. In countries like Malta and Saudi Arabia, the only water supply comes from groundwater; and Tunisia, Belgium, Morocco, and Germany depend on groundwater for more than 75 percent of their supply. In the United States, 75 percent of counties source groundwater directly for human consumption, meaning that more than half the U.S. population depends on it.


REVIEWS
Un panorama de las ciencias
sociales en México
, by Cristina Puga

Ana Luna

In an attempt to reconcile their methodological, theoretical, and historical diversity, social scientists seek to cover a series of complex problems and constantly reflect on their own practice. The article “El manifiesto por las ciencias sociales” (Manifesto for the Social Sciences), by Calhoun and Wieviorka, published by Revista mexicana de ciencias políticas y sociales (Mexican Journal of Political and Social Sciences) and mentioned by the author,1 debates the possibility of improving conditions for society and individuals and their ability to have a positive impact on collective life. For that reason, the social sciences have the purpose of revealing trends, pinpointing absences or positive results, and demonstrating when none of this is possible.



Our Voice
Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez

Society

Corporate Borders
Auto Industry Migrants in Mexico
Oyuki Arce Miyaki
Camelia Tigau

Canadian Refugee Status
Pinning Hope on the “Other Norte”
Araceli Pérez Mendoza

Politics

Mexamerica at War with Donald Trump
A Case Study in California
Part II
David R. Maciel

History

Italian and Mexican
Migrants in the U.S.
Silvia Núñez García

Art and Culture

Freedom Has No Borders and
No Human Being Is Illegal
Francisco Elías Prada

There, in the Clear Waters
Gretta Hernández

Tigerdog
by Raúl Motta

Threatened Species
Of Common Concern
Ana Luna
Ricardo Figueroa

So Far from God and
So Close to Each Other:
The United States in
Contemporary Mexican Art
María Emilia Fernández

Honduran Woman on La Isla
Bonita Migrates to Mexico
To Cross into the United States
by Zazil Collins

Dossier Water

Toward Comprehensive Groundwater
Management in Mexico

Water, Power, and Society
Samuel Schmidt Nedvedovich

Managing Groundwater in Mexico
Fernando J. González Villarreal
Jorge Alberto Arriaga Medina

Beyond Basins
The Political Delimitation
Of Aquifers in Mexico
Mónica Olvera Molina

The Science Needed to Understand
And Protect Groundwater and
Preserve the Environment
José Joel Carrillo-Rivera
Rafael Huízar-Álvarez
Gonzalo Hatch Kuri

Groundwater Flow Systems
And Climate Change
Adaptation in Mexico
Marcos Adrián Ortega Guerrero

Resilient Families amidst
Adversity in Colonias
Irasema Coronado

Challenges for Mexico-U.S.
Transboundary Aquifer Management
Gonzalo Hatch Kuri

Reviews

Mexico Movies about the Border
Ana Luna

Reviews

Un panorama de las ciencias sociales en México, by Cristina Puga
Ana Luna

Directory

Director
Graciela Martínez-Zalce Sánchez
zalce@unam.mx


Coordinator of Publications
Astrid Velasco Montante
astridvm@unam.mx

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Jiménez Andreu
tejian@unam.mx

See Complete Directory

About Us

Voices of Mexico is published by the Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte, CISAN (Center for Research on North América) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico).

The magazine brings our readers information about different issues of general interest in Mexico, particularly regarding culture and the arts, the environment, and socio-economic development. It features critical articles and literature by Mexican authors in English and is distributed in Mexico, the United States, and Canada.

Contact

Address: Torre II de Humanidades, piso 9, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.
Telephone: (52-55) 5623 0308
                                    5623 02 81
Fax: (52-55) 5623 0308
Electronic mail: voicesmx@unam.mx